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Year A, Cycle I

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FOLLOW THE PATH OF THE LORD

Liturgical Colour: 

Gen. 13:2, 5-18 & Mt. 7:6,12-14

Some people make it their rule of life to look after number one because, as they will tell you, if they don't then nobody else will. Abraham was not of that mind. When his herdsmen and those of his nephew, Lot, quarrelled over grazing rights for their flocks, he allowed Lot to take his choice of the richer portion of the land.

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WE COUNT MORE THAN A FLOCK OF SPARROWS!

Liturgical Colour: 

Jer. 20:10-13; Rom. 5:12-15; Mt. 10 26-33

Some of us fail to recognise our worth. The world has many ways of putting us down. More often than not, it simply ignores us! A sense of our own self-worth is difficult to build, and even more difficult to maintain. Today's Gospel reading addresses this fact.

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IN OUR WEAKNESS WE CAN ALWAYS RELY ON GOD

Liturgical Colour: 

2 Cor. 11:18, 21-30 & Mt. 6:24-34

False prophets were leading the Corinthians astray. This meant that Saint Paul had to defend himself and try to win them back to the truth. They claimed to have the same authority and power that he had so to justify himself Paul had to reveal his credentials. He writes in the third person to diffuse his bragging but obviously experienced close encounters with God, remembering exactly when this mystical vision happened - 14 years ago - around the year 45 based on the composition of the letter.

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WHAT IS OUR TRUE HEARTS' DESIRE?

Liturgical Colour: 

2 Cor. 11:18, 21-30 & Mt.6:19-23

It appears that others were trying to rival Saint Paul in Corinth and were boasting about their accomplishments. He had to speak up for himself and, but for this, we would never have known about his sufferings and disappointments. He was able to undergo all these hardships because Jesus was his heart’s desire.

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THE MODEL OF ALL PRAYER

Liturgical Colour: 

2 Cor. 11:1-11 & Mt. 6: 7-15

Paul considers the church at Corinth to be a chaste virgin espoused to Christ yet in danger of being seduced by a false gospel. He also defends himself against the charge of being a financial burden to the Corinthians.

We are given the Our Father in today's Gospel reading, but it is a prayer that can become so familiar to us that there is a danger we fail to meditate on its riches.

The early Christian writer Tertullian called it “the summary of the whole gospel” and Saint Thomas Aquinas “the most perfect of prayers”.

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DONE ONLY TO PLEASE THE LORD

Liturgical Colour: 

2 Cor. 9:6-11 & Mt. 6:1-6, 16-18.

In living our Christianity Jesus does not want us to play to an audience. We should not have the motive of drawing people to ourselves who admire and applaud the good we do. The Christian life is not an on-stage performance.

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“BE PERFECT AS YOUR HEAVENLY FATHER IS PERFECT”

Liturgical Colour: 

2 Cor. 8: 1-9 & Mt 5: 43-48

The Christians in Jerusalem needed help. Paul praised the generosity of the Macedonians who gave far beyond their means in response to his appeal. He mentioned this to the more wealthy Corinthians hoping to spur them to be just as generous. He reminded them of the example of Jesus, “He was rich, but He became poor for your sake, to make you rich out of His poverty,”

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WHAT JESUS EXPECTS FROM HIS FOLLOWERS

Liturgical Colour: 

2 Cor. 6:1-10 & Mt. 5:38-42

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HOLY COMMUNION SHOULD BE A FORETASTE OF HEAVEN

Liturgical Colour: 

What does the feast of Corpus Christi mean to you?  It tells me just one thing – how Jesus must love us.  Who is Jesus?  He is the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity – God.  He reigns supreme in Heaven with His Father and the Holy Spirit and yet at the same time it is His ardent wish to live with us and be the food of our souls in Holy Communion.  Have we fully realised that truth?  That God wants to live with sinful us.
 

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BE A PERSON WHOSE WORD IS OUR BOND

Liturgical Colour: 

2 Cor. 5:14-21 & Mt. 3:33-37

The swearing of oaths begins in childhood when children make a pledge and promise to keep it on pain to themselves. 'Cross my heart and hope to die, stick a needle in my eye' is one of them. The oaths of adults are less extravagant, but no less binding when asked to say, 'The evidence I shall give to this court will be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.' Having been sworn, a person is required to keep a contract, to fulfil an obligation.

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